Sunday School Lessons
Mrs. Daisy B. Scott - Superintendent
(Updated February 22, 2021)

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February 7 – Called to Evangelize

Alternate Title – Called to Testify

Alternate Title #2 – Telling Others About Jesus


Bible Lesson: John 4:25-42 (KJV)


The key verse:
John 4:39 (KJV) - "And many of the Samaritans of that city believed on him for the saying of the woman, which testified, He told me all that ever I did. "

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Faithlife Reftagger)


What shall we learn from this lesson:

During the time of Jesus on earth, strict adherence to Jewish customs prohibited Jewish men, especially Rabbis, from greeting a woman in public. Considering this and the fact that Jews and Samaritans generally did not like each other, it was indeed a surprise to a Samaritan womanwho had come to a well to draw waterwhen Jesus asked her for a drink (John 4:7).

In addition, Jesus did not have any container or rope of which to use to obtain water from the well (John 4:11). He was alone for the disciples had gone to the village to buy food John 4:8. He would have to accept a drink from a Samaritan woman's container. This would be even more shocking.

Under these conditions, the Samaritan woman was surprised that Jesus talked to her and actually had asked for a drink (John 4:9).

She was also surprised when He told her things about herself that there should have been no way for Him to know (John 4:18). The way He talked to her and the things He said led her to ask if He was a prophet (John 4:19). Their conversation also led her to remark that one day the Messiah would come and answer all their questions (John 4:25).

Jesus took this opportunity to reveal to her that He was the Messiah (John 4:26). At this point, two things happened. The disciples returned and were shocked to see Him talking to a Samaritan woman.

Secondly, the woman was so startled at what Jesus had told her that she left her water jar beside the well and ran back to the village to tell the others about Jesus and their conversation.

In some respects, Jesus was probably considered radical because He did not mind talking to women. In fact, women at times were in his group of followers.

The Samaritan woman was excited to have heard the revelation from the man at the well. She had now become an evangelist, for she had a message to tell the others. Let us look at some attributes of evangelists that fit the woman's attitude:

Jesus knew what was beginning to happen. The people in the village streamed out to see Him (John 4:30). Souls would be saved that day and the days to come. This "harvest" was far more important than the food His disciples had brought for Him to eat (John 4:34).

Jesus agreed to stay for a while in the village and over the next two days, many more would come to hear Jesus and His message and to believe (John 4:41).

All believers are called to be evangelists in one respect or another. How many of the attributes of an evangelist listed above apply to us? The answer is - they all should apply to each of us.

Sometimes we can be in danger of losing some of our excitement and urgency about the message of Jesus Christ. That is the reason we must often ask for the Holy Spirit to inspire and rejuvenate us.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation Bible Version of John 4:25-42

The key verse: John 4:39 (NLT) - Many Samaritans from the village believed in Jesus because the woman had said, "He told me everything I ever did!"







February 14 – Mary Magdalene: A Faithful Disciple

Alternate Title – Called to Support

Alternate Title #2 – Jesus' Resurrection


Bible Lesson: Luke 8:1–3; Mark 15:40; John 20:10-18 KJV


The key verses:
Luke 8:1-2 (KJV) - "Soon afterward Jesus began a tour of the nearby towns and villages, preaching and announcing the Good News about the Kingdom of God. He took his twelve disciples with him, along with some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases. Among them were Mary Magdalene, from whom he had cast out seven demons; "

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Faithlife Reftagger)


What shall we learn from this lesson:

As we discussed in the lesson from last week, in some respects Jesus was probably considered radical during His earthly life because He did not mind talking to women ... even in public. The Samaritan woman at the well is a perfect example of this. Not only was she a woman but she was also a Samaritan (John 4:9).

In fact, women, at times, were in his group of followers. Typical Rabbis during that day treated women very differently. They did not like to have them in their group of followers and did not seek to teach them as they did with the male followers. The history books tell us that some Rabbis of that time period would avoid even speaking to women in public

This points to one important observation: We are all God's children and "God the Son" demonstrated this by the kind way he treated women while He was on Earth.

In modern times, some cultures are still slow to give women certain basic rights such as attending school, driving a car, and teaching religious ideals. But especially in our country, women are an invaluable asset to the Church and society in general. To accentuate this point, for the first time we now have a woman vice president of the United States.

Without them, a lot would go unrealized. It is not unusual for the majority of active members in a Christian church to be women. We are fortunate that Christ did not set the example of treating women as dismissively as some did.

Several women who were followers of Jesus are mentioned in our lesson Scripture.

Other women - There are many other women mentioned in the Bible that interacted with Jesus. Some appealed to His mercy and healing capability while others showed reverence and kindness to Him. In the next lesson, we will discuss another woman, Priscilla, who Paul called a co-worker in the ministry (Romans 16:3-4).


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation Bible Version of Luke 8:1–3; Mark 15:40; John 20:10-18 NLT

The key verses: Luke 8:1-2 (NLT) - "Soon afterward Jesus began a tour of the nearby towns and villages, preaching and announcing the Good News about the Kingdom of God. He took his twelve disciples with him, along with some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases. Among them were Mary Magdalene, from whom he had cast out seven demons;"





February 21 – Priscilla: Called to Minister

Alternate Title – Called to Explain

Alternate Title #2 – Teams for Jesus


Bible Lesson: Acts 18:1-3, 18-21, 24-26; Romans 16:3-4 KJV


The key verses:
Romans 16:3-4 (KJV) - "Greet Priscilla and Aquila my helpers in Christ Jesus: Who have for my life laid down their own necks: unto whom not only I give thanks, but also all the churches of the Gentiles."

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Faithlife Reftagger)


What shall we learn from this lesson:

In the 2018 movie, "Paul, Apostle of Christ," Aquila and Priscilla are two of the featured characters. They were portrayed as a loving and devoted married couple dedicated to the work of Christianity in the early first-century church.

This description encapsulates how they are remembered in real life. They are both saints in the Catholic Church.

Paul considered Priscilla to be one of his helpers in Jesus Christ (Romans 16:3 KJV). The word "helper" can be translated to mean "co-worker" or "fellow laborer." Some Bible versions use "co-worker" instead of helper.

It was very unusual for an Apostle such as Paul to consider a female as his co-worker in the ministry. There is no direct indication that she ever served as a preacher but it is obvious she used her gifts to further the ministry. Her formal name was Prisca with Priscilla being a Roman diminutive (pet name or name of affection).

In our reference scripture, the Apostle Paul became acquainted with, and friends of, a Jew named Aquila and his wife Priscilla while in Corinth. They had settled there after the Jews were forced out of Rome by Emperor Claudius (Acts 18:2).

As it turned out, Paul ended up living and working with them while in Corinth (Acts 18:3). We can only imagine the interesting discussions about Christianity they must have had with him.

By trade, they were tentmakers just as Paul was which may have contributed to their initial meeting. If they were not already Christian converts, they surely became converts after interacting with Paul for an extended period of time.

One of the first things that become apparent is Priscilla and Aquila were more than just a married couple; they were partners and a team when it came to working, marriage and ministry.

When the name of one is mentioned in the Bible, the name of the other is not far behind. They are mentioned in four books of the New Testament and a total of six times ... always as a couple. Sometimes Aquila's name comes first and other times Priscilla's name comes first.

They decided to join Paul on a missionary trip to the Syria region but they stopped in Ephesus where they were instrumental in helping the Christians there even after Paul had continued on toward Antioch. Words used in reference to the couple in the Bible are words of unity or togetherness, like "they and them."

When a talented preacher and eloquent speaker from Alexandria named Apollos came to town, the Bible says that they took him aside to explain the ways of God even more accurately (Acts 18:26). Using the word "they" indicated that both Aquila and Priscilla had a part in the conversation with Apollos.

Although he was a powerful speaker, Apollos' message was incomplete in some details. His messages were more in line with one who was a disciple of John the Baptist.

The Bible does not spell out the details of what was lacking but it does say, "He spoke knowing only the baptism of John" (Acts 18:25b NIV). Having lived and worked with Paul no doubt had prepared them to understand more fully what came after John the Baptist. They knew about the salvation through Jesus Christ and the presence of the Holy Spirit.

Aquila and Priscilla did not berate or publicly embarrass Apollos for leaving out some details in his messages. But rather, they talked to him in a private conversation (Acts 18:26b NASB).

This is a wise method of supplementing the knowledge of someone ... especially a leader or teacher in the church. Publicly correcting someone can cause irreparable emotional harm especially to young and sensitive leaders.

Eventually, the ban on Jews in Rome was lifted. Priscilla and Aquila then traveled back to Rome. There they used their home for church meetings (Romans 16:5). As was said earlier, Paul called them his helpers in the ministry (Romans 16:3 KJV).

Let's review what is special about Priscilla and Aquila as a couple?

  1. They worked together as a team: They are portrayed as a couple that worked together with a common purpose or goal. Thus, they encouraged each other. When Paul joined them in working as a tentmaker, the Scripture says "he worked with them" (Acts 18:3) indicating Priscilla also worked to help with the family business.

    Owning a business during that time required interaction with other people in order to sell a product or service. This may have been how they first met Paul and many other people.

    We can imagine they had a storefront in the market place that people visited. Even today, owning a business has a tendency to promote notoriety. We may know, or know of someone because they owned a daycare center or a restaurant or one of any other businesses.

    When they helped Apollos with the content of his messages, they did so as a team. The Scripture says they took him aside and explained to him the way of God more accurately.
    (Acts 18:26 ESV) indicating this was something they both wanted to do and did do.

    Apollos was receptive to learning more about Christ, the Holy Spirit, and other subjects. He had an opportunity to be helped by those who were students of the Apostle Paul. Afterwards, he used his speaking skills to argue that Christ was the Messiah. (Acts 18:28).

    Those that preach or teach the word should have the same attitude. Two of the most important attributes in spreading the word are accuracy and completeness. Therefore, all spiritual teaching should be based on the word and not just personal feelings.

  2. They kept conflict to a minimum: There was no indication in the reference text that any conflict was present with the couple. Paul was their house guest for a while and neither of them complained. They both joined Paul for a missionary trip with no argument about having to relocate.

  3. They both risked physical harm for helping Paul: Paul acknowledged that they had risked their lives for him (Romans 16:4). The Bible does not reveal any details of what specifically he was referring to but Paul was definitely thankful for what they had done for him.

    Being a Christian during this time in history was a serious and dangerous business. Many lost their lives at the hands of the Romans. Ultimately, Paul, Priscilla and Aquila were put to death because they held on to their Christian faith. All three were made Saints in the Catholic Church.

We can learn a lot from this couple that would benefit our own marriage or relationship. To function as a team with little conflict while focusing on a common goal is a recipe for success. To be willing to take a chance and face danger or unfamiliar circumstances together will increase our bond with each other.

These attributes apply to not only married couples but to the brothers and sisters in the church. Aquila and Priscilla used their gifts to advance God's kingdom and church on the earth. All believers have at least one spiritual gift that can be used in the same way.

Where do these gifts come from that benefit God's kingdom and church on earth? They come from God through the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 12:11). A partial list of possible spiritual gifts is wisdom, leadership, discernment, teaching, faith, mercy, service, being a pastor, evangelism, hospitality, and missionary work.

Aquila and Priscilla at least exhibited the spiritual gifts of hospitality, leadership, and teaching. They opened their home to Paul and ultimately used their home for church meetings after returning to Rome. They discussed with the gifted preacher Apollos areas that he needed to know to better teach about salvation through Jesus Christ.

They supported each other and helped advance the church in Corinth, Ephesus, and Rome. They ultimately gave their lives due to the oppression of Christians, while seeking to advance God's kingdom on earth.

If we can determine our spiritual gift/s we can better learn what our true calling is in the church. We all can't be gifted preachers and evangelists as Apollos was but every gift has a special place in the Body of Christ ... which is the Church. A search on the Internet for "How to determine my spiritual gift" will lead to a wealth of sites to aid in determining our special gift/s.


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation Bible Version of Acts 18:1-3, 18-21, 24-26; Romans 16:3-4 NLT

The key verses: Romans 16:3-4 (NLT) - "Give my greetings to Priscilla and Aquila, my co-workers in the ministry of Christ Jesus. In fact, they once risked their lives for me. I am thankful to them, and so are all the Gentile churches."







February 28 – Lydia: Called to Serve

Alternate Title – Called to Serve

Alternate Title #2 – Serving for Jesus


Bible Lesson: Acts 16:11-15, 40; 1 Corinthians 1:26-30 KJV


The key verse:
Acts 16:15 (KJV) - "And when she was baptized, and her household, she besought us, saying, If ye have judged me to be faithful to the Lord, come into my house, and abide there. And she constrained us."

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Faithlife Reftagger)


What shall we learn from this lesson:

For the last several Sundays we have been studying women who recognized the reality of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and those who helped advance Christianity for His sake.

Their stories exhibit a muti-dimensional relationship that women have had with the Lord. Anna recognized and announced who He was when, as a baby, He was brought to the Temple. The Samaritan woman at the well recognized and announced who He was to those in her village. Mary Magdalene recognized who He was and became one of His followers in both the physical and spiritual sense. Priscilla recognized who He was after His ascension and helped build up His church to the extent that Paul considered her to be a co-worker in the ministry.

In the lesson for today, we will discuss another woman, Lydia, who used her gifts of hospitality and service to provide comfort to Paul and others who sought to advance the church.

Every stage in the development of Christianity has involved women. The examples listed above gives us the true impression that women have had a great part in the advancement of Christianity. Over the years since Paul, the participation of women in the ministry has only grown.

Lydia was possibly Paul's first convert in Europe. It would appear his first meeting of her in Philippi (in the European continent) was by chance but we know that "by chance" and "by luck" are two phrases not associated with the Lord. We would rather conclude that Paul's initial meeting of Lydia was controlled by the Lord.

If we examine the Scripture we will find that the Holy Spirit had led Paul and Silas to bypass Phrygia and Galatia (Acts 16:6) and also the province of Bithynia (Acts 16:7). Instead, they were guided toward Macedonia by a vision Paul had (Acts 16:9). They ended up in Philippi, a major city of the district of Macedonia.

Because the scripture uses the plural personal pronouns "we," and "us" it is thought that Luke was also with Paul and Silas since we give him the credit for writing Acts.

The Jewish population at Philippi was too small to have a synagogue. At least 10 adult Jewish men were needed before a synagogue could be formed. However, there was a place near the Gangites River where the Jews would meet for prayer.

Paul went there and spoke to a group of women (Acts 16:13). The Bible does not state there were any men in the group at the river perhaps because Jewish men and women during this period of time did not worship together.

One of the women present was Lydia, who was a successful businesswoman in the trade of selling expensive purple cloth. She was originally from Thyatira which was known for that type of cloth. She was convicted by Paul's message of Christ (Acts 16:14) and was baptized along with other members of her household.

She was forceful in convincing Paul and the others (Silas and Luke) to stay at her house until he agreed (Acts 16:15). Hospitality is one of the Christian virtues and is also considered a spiritual gift. Notice that the pronoun us* and is used in this text:

"And when she was baptized, and her household, she besought us*, saying, If ye have judged me to be faithful to the Lord, come into my house, and abide there. And she constrained us*." Acts 16:15 KJV

On another day, as Paul was going to the place of prayer, he would encounter a slave girl and this encounter would end with him and Silas being thrown into jail. The slave girl was demon-possessed but some thought she could tell the future.

Those in control of her made money through the belief she was a fortune-teller. When Paul drove the demon out of her through the name of Jesus Christ, her masters dragged Paul and Silas before the city officials and as a result, they were beaten and thrown into jail.

This seemingly unfortunate change in the course of events was turned into a blessing because it led to the jailer and his family becoming converts (Acts 16:33). After they were released from jail they went back to Lydia's house where they met with believers and encouraged them again (Acts 16:40).

By showing Paul and Silas more hospitality even though they were just coming from prison Lydia showed courage in supporting them because she knew of their Christian character and had confidence in them.

People sometimes are very quick to believe negative gossip about someone even though they know the personwho is the object of the gossipto be a good and decent individual. Taking Lydia's example, we should not let someone's negative and destructive claims about a friend destroy our opinion of that friend.

The mob used negative and destructive claims about Jesus to bring about his torture and death on the cross. Those making the claims no doubt thought they had won the battle. We can only wonder how they would feel if they could see 2000 years into the future how the cross of Jesus still lives in our hearts.


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation Bible Version of Acts 16:11-15, 40; 1 Corinthians 1:26-30 NLT

The key verse: Acts 16:15 (NLT) - "'She and her household were baptized, and she asked us to be her guests. 'If you agree that I am a true believer in the Lord,' she said, 'come and stay at my home.' And she urged us until we agreed."






March 7 – Moses: Prophet of Deliverance

Alternate Title – Prophet of Deliverance


Bible Lesson: Deuteronomy 18:15-22 KJV


The key verse:
Deuteronomy 18:15 (KJV) - "The LORD thy God will raise up unto thee a Prophet from the midst of thee, of thy brethren, like unto me; unto him ye shall hearken;"

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Faithlife Reftagger)


What shall we learn from this lesson:

Deuteronomy is Moses' last address to the people - his farewell book of guidance. In it are commandments, instructions, prophecy, warnings, and many other topics that would help the people, he had led, to address what was ahead for them. These were mostly the 2nd generation of those who the Lord freed from Egyptian captivity.

Two things would happen after this book was completed. Moses would be taken away from the people through death and God would bury him in a valley near Beth-peor in Moab, but no one knows the exact place (Deut 34:5-6). Secondly, the tribes would be led into the land of which God had promised Abraham by someone other than Moses. God chose Joshua to lead the people into the promised land and to take over from Moses (Numbers 27:18-19).

In Deuteronomy, Moses told the people that a prophet would come in the future that would be like him (like Moses). In fact, there had been no prophet in Israel like Moses to that point whom the Lord knew face to face (Deut 34:10).

After Moses, there would be many prophets that would come out of the people to speak for God, but all of these would just foreshadow the ultimate prophet that Moses was referring.

When John the Baptist was asked if he was the Prophet they were expecting, he said no (John 1:26:21). They asked him, "Then who are you?"

"John replied in the words of the prophet Isaiah: 'I am a voice shouting in the wilderness, Clear the way for the LORD’s coming!’”

The Lord to whom he was referring we know is Jesus Christ. He is God Himself in the flesh (John 1:1, Matthew 1:23). He is the ultimate prophet the words of Moses described. Who can better speak for God than God Himself?

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation Bible Version of Deuteronomy 18:15-22 NLT

The key verse: Deuteronomy 18:15 (NLT) - "Moses continued, "The LORD your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from among your fellow Israelites. You must listen to him."





March 14 – Joshua: Prophet of Conquest

Alternate Title – Prophet of Conquest


Bible Lesson: Joshua 5:13-6:5, 15-16, 20 KJV


The key verse:
Joshua 6:2 (KJV) - "And the LORD said unto Joshua, See, I have given into thine hand Jericho, and the king thereof, and the mighty men of valour."

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Faithlife Reftagger)


What shall we learn from this lesson:

This lesson is about the miracle of the walls of Jericho collapsing when the Israelites followed God's specific directions of marching around the city. It is one of the best demonstrations of faith that we know of in the Bible. Many songs have been performed that testify to this extraordinary display of the Lord's power ... through faith.

Those of us who have a personal "Jericho" about which to testify know the exhilaration of gratitude to the Lord when something that doesn't make sense happens anyway when we totally put our confidence in God.

It happened to me about 25 years ago when I was involved in the creation of our church website. We could not get an animation to work for our main page. We finally gave up after working on the problem for several days and asked the Lord for a solution through prayer.

The solution that I received was like saying one plus one equals five. It didn't make sense but only through faith we did it anyway on the Internet and it worked! Today, after years of web design experience including training classes, that solution still doesn't make sense to me except to say it was God's will.

In Joshua 5:13 we find Joshua face to face with a man with his sword already drawn. Theologians are not in complete agreement with who this man was. Some believe He was God, the pre-incarnate Christ, or an angel. Still, some others believe he was exactly who he said he was: The commander of the Lord's army.

In any case, Joshua immediately realized the commander could be a great sign of victory or a sign of doom ... for who can defeat the Lord's army or the commander of that army? But when Joshua asked the commander if he was with them or against them, he said "no." Since the Lord had already promised this land to the Israelites and had chosen Joshua to lead them into the land, the outcome was already decided.

The answer of "no" could simply mean the commander was under direct orders of the Lord and perhaps he was there to make sure the battle would end as the Lord wanted. But in reality, the Bible doesn't reveal to us why the commander was there.


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation Bible Version of Joshua 5:13-6:5, 15-16, 20 NLT

The key verse: Joshua 6:2 (NLT) - "But the LORD said to Joshua, "I have given you Jericho, its king, and all its strong warriors."





March 21 – Huldah: Prophet of Wisdom

Alternate Title – Prophet of Wisdom


Bible Lesson: 2 Kings 22:14-20 KJV


The key verse:
2 Kings 22:19 (KJV) - "Because thine heart was tender, and thou hast humbled thyself before the LORD, when thou heardest what I spake against this place, and against the inhabitants thereof, that they should become a desolation and a curse, and hast rent thy clothes, and wept before me; I also have heard thee, saith the LORD."

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Faithlife Reftagger)


What shall we learn from this lesson:

The synopsis of this lesson will be posted on or before Monday, March 1, 2021.


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation Bible Version of 2 Kings 22:14-20 NLT

The key verse: 2 Kings 22:19 (NLT) - "You were sorry and humbled yourself before the LORD when you heard what I said against this city and its people—that this land would be cursed and become desolate. You tore your clothing in despair and wept before me in repentance. And I have indeed heard you, says the LORD."







For access to all chapters of the King James Version Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the Audio-Bible.com web site.

For other versions (NIV, New Living Translation, etc.) of the Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the World Wide Study Bible page of Christian Classics Eternal Library site. Also visit the New Living Translation web site.

Some information on this page may be referenced from the NLT Study Bible, the Standard Lesson Commentary, and Commentary by David Guzik, and gotquestions.org. Frederick L. Marsh is the commentary author of the information contained in this page. He is the author of the book: "The Book of the Holy Spirit: Joyful living." The opinions expressed on this page are his alone.



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