Sunday School Lessons
Mrs. Daisy B. Scott - Superintendent
(Updated February 15, 2020)

Sunday School classes start at 9:30 AM every Sunday.


The lesson segments include a synopsis of the lesson and a link to AudioBible.com where the reference Scripture will be played in audio and displayed on the screen.  If your computer cannot play the file, download a free copy of RealPlayer at the Real.com site. Also in each lesson segment will be a link to the New Living Translation version of the reference Scripture. This version is easier to understand than some of the other translations.


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February 2 – Single-Minded Obedience

Alternate Title – Jesus Gives Us Power Over the Devil

Bible Lesson: Matthew 4:1-11 (KJV)


Key verses:
Matthew 4:10 (KJV) - "Then Jesus said to him, "Away with you, Satan! For it is written, 'You shall worship the LORD your God, and Him only you shall serve.' " "

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

What shall we learn from this lesson:
We all will face sinful temptations to do something disobedient to God. Sometimes it will be small and other times much greater. Some of us are at a point in our life where we have one major temptation which stands out as the greatest of them all. How will we handle temptation?

In our reference Scripture, we saw how Jesus resisted and did not fall victim to the temptations thrown at Him by Satan. He did this even though He was in a human body which was subject to the same shortcomings as the bodies we have.

The question remains, "How will we handle the temptation to sin which Satan will throw at us?

Will we rely on one excuse or another why we give in to sin or use the old rationalization that we are just human and will sin? Jesus proved He could resist the lure of doing what Satan wanted Him to do. He is our model and what Christians should aspire to be like.

Satan represents a single-minded evil force that wants us to sin against God. As Jesus demonstrated to us, we should desire to have the force of single-minded obedience to God's desires. This puts us into spiritual warfare with Satan and his demons. The devil is our enemy and the lure of worldly pleasure is his weapon.

The Lord will allow the devil to tempt us, just as He did with His Son Jesus. In this respect, our character is being tested and we are being prepared for the battle with Satan which will last for the rest of life on earth. But we must remember that it is not God who is tempting us. He will never tempt us to sin (James 1:13).

The "evil one" will often come at us in disguise, even when we are in the house of worship. He may even resort to quoting Scripture to prompt us to lower our defenses. In the reference text for today (Matthew 4:6), Satan quoted Psalms 91:11-12 in an attempt to lure Jesus into doing what he wanted.

God will not allow us to be tempted beyond what we can bear and He will always give us a way out of sinful temptation. In 1 Corinthians 10:13 NLT, we find these words:

"The temptations in your life are no different from what others experience. And God is faithful. He will not allow the temptation to be more than you can stand. When you are tempted, he will show you a way out so that you can endure."

This is a power which God has given us over the Devil's attempt to defeat us. Another power God has given us is the presence of the Holy Spirit within us. He is there to help us live a holy life and resist the temptation to sin. Using these powers and our weaponthe word of Godeach day we go out into battle against Satan in a war which we have gratefully already won through the sacrifice of Jesus Christ on the cross.


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation Bible Version of Matthew 4:1-11.

The key verse: Matthew 4:10 (NLT) - "Get out of here, Satan," Jesus told him. "For the Scriptures say, 'You must worship the Lord your God and serve only him.'"







February 9 – Piety That Honors God

Alternate Title – God-Honoring Piety

Alternate Title #2 – Be Humble for God

Bible Lesson: Matthew 6:1-8 (KJV)


Key verses:
Matthew 6:1 (KJV) - "Take heed that ye do not your alms before men, to be seen of them: otherwise ye have no reward of your Father which is in heaven."

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

What shall we learn from this lesson:
As we have learned so many times in Bible study, God not only cares about what we do but also our motivation behind our actions; where our heart is. Our actions and our thoughts should bring glory to the Lord, but that is not always the case. Sometimes we do the right thing for the wrong reasons.

When we give money or our time because we truly want to help someone in need, we have accomplished a double-action donation; doing the right thing for the right reason. When we do this thing because we know it will please the Lord, it becomes a triple-action event; doing the right thing for the right reason in the name of God.

What we should desire is for people to view our charitable accomplishments and deeds as simply godly people doing godly work. However, it is only human nature for us to wish for acknowledgment of our good deeds by someone.

In the Christian community, we encourage each other by "pats on the back" for a good deed or a good job done. It's alright to give encouragement and it is alright to accept encouraging words and even awards for our actions as long as receiving praise was not our only motivation.

Therefore, there are some things we do not want to do when it comes to donating our time and money to a worthy cause. We want to be humble in our giving; not giving simply to impress others (Matthew 6:2). In other words, we should not brag about our accomplishments in helping the less fortunate or a worthy cause.

There is not much more which turns people off about us and what we have done in life as the notion that we are bragging. It's okay to tell someone about a charitable accomplishment if this will encourage them to do the same as long as we are careful about how we tell them. We want to be sure that our gift is to glorify God and not for our own glory.

How we pray is another subject which involves motive. Some people have a very impressive way of praying in public for a group of people. The words roll off their tongue in a way that can stir the emotions of anyone who hears it.

This is a good thing as long as the prayer is not a practiced repetition of previous prayers; giving very little thought to the meaning of what is being said (Matthew 6:7 KJV). This is comparable to reciting the Pledge of Allegiance and sometimes even the Lord's Prayer. Each prayer we give should be important enough for us to actually think about what we are saying.

In conclusion, we want to continue to do the right thing and give generously of our time and money to the church and other worthy organizations. Today's lesson teaches us to go one step beyond giving to a worthy cause and that is to give because we really want to help others and not just to receive personal praise and glory (Matthew 6:1).

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation Bible Version of Matthew 6:1-8.

The key verse: Matthew 6:1 (NLT) - "Watch out! Don't do your good deeds publicly, to be admired by others, for you will lose the reward from your Father in heaven."







February 16 – The Prayer of Jesus

Alternate Title – Kingdom-Seeking Prayer

Alternate Title #2 – The Lord's Prayer

Bible Lesson: Matthew 6:9-15 (KJV)


Key verses:
Matthew 6:10 (KJV) - "
Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven."

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

What shall we learn from this lesson:
In the discussion of the lesson from last week, the following was said:

"Some people have a very impressive way of praying in public for a group of people. The words roll off their tongue in a way that can stir the emotions of anyone who hears it.

"This is a good thing as long as the prayer is not a practiced repetition of previous prayers; giving very little thought to the meaning of what is being said (Matthew 6:7 KJV). This is comparable to reciting the Pledge of Allegiance and sometimes even the Lord's Prayer. Each prayer we give should be important enough for us to actually think about what we are saying."

The lesson for this week is very important because it is totally about the Lord's Prayer and the meaning of each part. This discussion will help us be more aware of what we are saying as we pray the Lord's Prayer or use it as our model.

It is said the ACTS method of prayer (adoration, confession, thanksgiving, and supplication) is loosely based on the Lord's Prayer but we will not attempt to draw parallels in this discussion. For more information specifically on the ACTS approach follow this link.

We can see that the Lord's Prayer has two parts. The first part concerns honor and devotion to God (verses 9 and 10). The second part concerns us and our needs (verses 11-13).


First Part of the Prayer - Honor and Devotion to God

The Lord's Prayer starts with "Our Father which art in heaven." Believers are children of God through Jesus Christ. Through faith we have received Jesus as our Lord and Savior, and therefore have the privilege to be called children of God (John 1:12, 1 John 3:1).

When we pray, we can refer to God as our Father just as Jesus did. By using the word "our," Jesus is including us and not just Himself. God is not an ordinary Father but our eternal Father in heaven - the One who is responsible for our very existence and the existence of all our ancestors. Therefore we glorify and worship Him by saying, "Hallowed be Thy name" (Matthew 6:9 KJV).

In other words, any reference to Him should be treated as Holy and sacred. So many today disregard this and use the word "God" flippantly which is a direct violation of the third commandment: "You shall not misuse the name of the LORD your God, for the LORD will not hold anyone guiltless who misuses his name" (Exodus 20:7 NIV).

Among all the words in the Lord's Prayer, three words—Thy Kingdom come—carry so much weight we could have a whole lesson on just that statement. Let us briefly list some of the meaning that statement carries:

We can see now why we can call this prayer a kingdom-seeking prayer.

The Lord's Prayer confirms that God is the Divine One who has supreme control over all in existence. This fact is what makes prayer a form of worship. We are praying to God because He is the only one who can truly change anything and the One who has control of our life.

That's what is meant by, "...Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven" (Matt 6:10 KJV). This is a declarative statement rather than a request, expressing our confidence that however God declares things to be, so shall they be, regardless if it is on earth or in Heaven. His will is sovereign. We have confidence in His wisdom, so this statement also means that however God wants things to be, so should they be.

In summary, the first part of the Lord's pray generally concerns honor and devotion to God. More specifically this part concerns glory to God, His kingdom, and His sovereign will.


Second Part of the Lord's Prayer - Our Needs and Desires

The prayer contains a petition to God to allow us to see this new day and to be given subsistence for that day: "Give us this day our daily bread" (Matt 6:11 KJV). This indicates we should plan to make that request every single day. We are asking for God to give us what we have no guarantee to possess...life for a new day. We emphasize the words: "give us". When He gives us something, it is a gift by His grace and through His mercy for we are sinful beings and have not earned this gift (Romans 6:23).

No day is guaranteed to us and therefore life should be considered a daily gift from God. In past times, many used the expression, "Here today ... gone tomorrow." Recently, many have now started using the expression, "Here today ... gone today." The more grateful we are to see each new day; the more difficult it is for depression and disharmony to rule our life.

Another important petition included in the prayer is a request to be forgiven of our sins: "And forgive us our debts, As we forgive our debtors" (Matt 6:12 KJV). This petition comes with a requirement or stipulation in which we should likewise forgive others who have done us wrong. Jesus explained this part specifically, thus emphasizing the importance of the fact that we should forgive others if we expect God to forgive us:

"For if ye forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you: But if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses" (Matt 6:14-15 KJV).

The final petition in the Lord's Prayer is a request for help in not falling to the temptation to sin and also protection from the influence of the evil one; who is Satan.

The prayer ending is befitting of its contents: Matt 6:13b states "For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen." The prayer began with glorifying God and ended with glorifying God. So should each day of our life be.


Conclusion:
Using the Lord's Prayer as our model, the first part of our prayers should be for God and His honor. Then the second part of the prayer can go to our needs and desires. This should be the case also in our daily life: first comes God, then us.

In a memorable sermon from years ago, a preacher said the first part of each day should be dedicated to God. It could be something as simple as a prayer or a scriptural reading. That's the least we can do for God who has done so much for us.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation Bible Version of Matthew 6:1-8.

The key verse: Matthew 6:10 (NLT) - "May your Kingdom come soon. May your will be done on earth, as it is in heaven."







February 23 – Perseverance in Prayer

Alternate Title – Ever-Persevering Petitions

Alternate Title #2 – Ask God in Prayer

Bible Lesson: Luke 11:5-13 (KJV)


Key verses:
Luke 11:9 (KJV) - "And I say unto you, Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you."

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

What shall we learn from this lesson:
Being persistent in praying for something isn't done because we believe God will forget our request or we need to remind Him or that nagging Him with our request will irritate Him enough such that He will finally grant what we want just to get rid of our bothersome reminders.

Being persistent in praying for something specific is done for our benefit. Sometimes God desires for us to really want something such that it becomes a passionate desire. Then we can better appreciate His grace when our request is granted.

Think of how passionately King Hezekiah pleaded with God—to the point of tears—to allow him to live longer (2 Kings 20:3) after God had said he would die from his affliction (2 Kings 20:1). The LORD saw his passion and his tears and extended his life by 15 years. Excerpts from 2 Kings 20:5-6 NLT tell of God's mercy and grace as a result of Hezekiah's plea:

"I have heard your prayer and seen your tears. I will heal you, and ... add fifteen years to your life..."

When Jonah was disobedient to God and found himself in the belly of a great fish, we can only imagine the desperation he must have experienced when he prayed to God. In Jonah 2:1-2, 10 we find these words:

"From inside the fish Jonah prayed to the LORD his God. He said: 'In my distress I called to the LORD, and he answered me. From deep in the realm of the dead I called for help, and you listened to my cry.' And the LORD commanded the fish, and it vomited Jonah onto dry land."

Just as with Jonah and Hezekiah most of us during our lifetime have needed a favor from someone so badly that we have almost begged for it. Perhaps we needed someone to forgive us for something we have done or we were asking for money for some desperate need.

When the person we are asking senses our humble manner and desperation, they are more apt to give serious consideration to our request as opposed to someone asking casually.

God wants us to love and worship Him with passion and purpose. Jesus said the greatest commandment is (Matthew 22:37 ESV):

"You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind."

When we commune with God in prayer through Jesus Christ, we should not lose track of who He is and who we are. When we ask for something, it should be within the confines of His will.

In this regard, some of the passion we have for the Lord should shine through when we ask for something specific. In other words, our request should be persistent to the point of being passionate. If we give up on our request after only a few times, perhaps we did not really want it in the first place.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation Bible Version of Luke 11:5-13.

The key verse: Luke 11:9 (NLT) - "And so I tell you, keep on asking, and you will receive what you ask for. Keep on seeking, and you will find. Keep on knocking, and the door will be opened to you."







March 1 – A Call to Accountability

Bible Lesson: Amos 5:18-24 (KJV)


Key verse:
Amos 5:24 (KJV) - "But let judgment run down as waters, and righteousness as a mighty stream."

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

What shall we learn from this lesson:
The theme of this segment of Scripture from Amos is very simply that God is not interested in "lip service" from us but instead He wants us to live a godly life. It is how we live that is important because in the end we will all be held accountable for our actions.

The reference text cautions the readers to not look forward to "the day of the Lord" if they expect a favorable judgment based only on their empty words and hypocritical actions. The Lord does not like show and pretense and empty adherence to religious celebrations (Amos 5:21).

For us, in the society of today, we can make a good show of being a faithful Christian by often going to worship service and Bible study, and contributing generously to the church.

But then, away from the eyes of the casual observer, the hypocrites willingly participate in sinful living. They go places they shouldn't go, do things they shouldn't do, and say things they shouldn't say.

If those around us were grading us on how we will be rewarded for our living, we may get high marks when the Day of judgment comes. The problem with this scenario is that God is the one grading us and not other people.

He holds us accountable for both secret and public living. He sees through any false facade that displays us as model Christians when we are not truly that way. He knows how we truly think and live.

The reference Scripture ends on a high note; one of great expectation. Amos 5:24 NKJV is the ending of our reference text. It is a prophetic statement of hope for our future actions:

"But let justice run down like water, And righteousness like a mighty stream."

The lesson for today challenges us to do more than hypocritical living and only giving God "lip service." We are challenged to live as God wants us to in a society that holds justice and righteousness in high esteem. Then we can continue to look forward to the "Day of the Lord" when all of us will give an accounting for our former life.


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation Bible Version of Amos 5:18-24.

The key verse: Amos 5:24 (NLT) - "Instead, I want to see a mighty flood of justice, an endless river of righteous living."






For access to all chapters of the King James Version Bible in audio and visual formats, visit
the Audio-Bible.com web site.

For other versions (NIV, New Living Translation, etc.) of the Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the World Wide Study Bible page of Christian Classics Eternal Library site. Also visit the New Living Translation web site.

Some information on this page may be referenced from the NLT Study Bible, the Standard Lesson Commentary, and Commentary by David Guzik. Frederick L. Marsh is the commentary author of the information contained in this page. He is the author of the book: "The Book of the Holy Spirit: Joyful living." Any opinions expressed or writings on this page are his responsibility.



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