Sunday School Lessons
Mrs. Daisy B. Scott - Superintendent
(Updated July 1, 2024)

Sunday School classes start at 9:30 AM every Sunday.



June 30, 2024 – Remembering Jesus Christ
Principle Topic – 1-2 Timothy

Focus Verses (KJV)- 2 Timothy 2:8-15 KJV

Focus Verses (NLT)- 2 Timothy 2:8-15 NLT

(Pop-up references come from courtesy of Faithlife Reftagger)


The Key Verse -

(In King James Version):

"Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth."
2 Timothy 2:15 KJV

(In New Living Translation):

"Work hard so you can present yourself to God and receive his approval. Be a good worker, one who does not need to be ashamed and who correctly explains the word of truth." 2 Timothy 2:15 NLT



What shall we learn from this lesson:

2 Timothy was written by Paul while in a Roman prison. This letter was unique because it was written by Paul knowing that he would probably soon be executed. That type of information changes our whole outlook on our life because we know that the life we have enjoyed from the day we were born would soon be taken from us.

We can imagine that a person in his place in life would focus more on the important things than on the trivial aspects of existence. Some of us have gone through a time when our life or a close loved one's life hung in the balance. Our prayers to God during those times would be different than normal.

Some of us may feel some remorse for Paul since a lot of the New Testament was written by him. His writings were meant to guide us into being better Christians. As we complete the book of 2 Timothy we may feel somewhat sad knowing that as he was writing this book he was aware that his life would soon be coming to an end.

Paul viewed death in a positive manner. If he lived, he would have more time to work for Christ but if he died, he would be able to see the Lord even sooner:

"For to me, living means living for Christ, and dying is even better. But if I live, I can do more fruitful work for Christ. So I really don't know which is better. I'm torn between two desires: I long to go and be with Christ, which would be far better for me." Philippians 1:21-22 NLT

Paul wrote 13 of the 27 books in the New Testament; many of which were letters of instruction, inspiration, and spiritual guidance in church or personal lives. Even though his writings originated over 2,000 years ago, his wisdom is still being used today by us and other Christians.

His writing of 2 Timothy started in verse 1 by reminding the reader that Paul had been appointed by the will of God to be an Apostle of Christ Jesus (1 Tim 1:1-2). The letter was written to Timothy, Paul's true son in faith.

Timothy had good role models to point him toward the worship of Christ and possibly Christian ministry. Not only was Timothy a close friend to Paul, an apostle of Christ, but there was also his Grandmother, Lois, and his mother, Eunice, (2 Tim 1:5) to help support him if he should continue into ministry. We are not told what Spiritual Gift Timothy had but we can certainly guess it was ministry.

How important is it for a Christian to have good role models and family support?

Paul told Timothy not to be ashamed to tell others about the Lord or about him and his time in jail. Why? Because he was in prison for Jesus in order to suffer for Him (2 Tim 1:8-9).

Paul perhaps could have escaped all the imprisonments and much of the persecution he experienced if he had renounced Jesus but he would not do that because he viewed his persecution as suffering for the sake of Christ. (2 Tim 2:5)

We should seek to use Paul as a model for our devotion to the Lord. He was willing to suffer for the sake of Christ. He used his remaining time in life to glorify the Lord and he looked forward to seeing the Lord after death.

 

 

 


July 7, 2024 – Live the Truth, Teach the Truth
Principle Topic – Titus

Focus Verses (KJV)- Titus 2:1-15 KJV

Focus Verses (NLT)- Titus 2:1-15 NLT

(Pop-up references come from courtesy of Faithlife Reftagger)


The Key Verse -

(In King James Version):

"In all things shewing thyself a pattern of good works: in doctrine shewing uncorruptness, gravity, sincerity."
Titus 2:7 KJV

(In New Living Translation):

"And you yourself must be an example to them by doing good works of every kind. Let everything you do reflect the integrity and seriousness of your teaching." Titus 2:7 NLT



What shall we learn from this lesson:

1 and 2 Timothy were written by the Apostle Paul and they were intended to give leaders (Pastors) of congregations helpful guidance. Timothy was a pastor in Ephesus. Subjects like "how to lead a congregation and how to solve problem issues that come up in a church such as False teachers and false doctrine were touched on mainly in 2 Timothy.

These letters were called pastoral epistles. During the early 1st century, Paul traveled extensively preaching the gospel, planting churches and trying to help new congregations and young pastors to succeed.

A third pastor who received this type pastoral epistle letter from Paul was Titus who was on the island of Crete. It is estimated that Paul traveled over 10,000 miles, mostly by foot, during this time on what was called missionary journeys.

During this period he also spent a considerable amount of time in prison because of his preaching the gospel.

The inhabitants of Crete were of a rugged and tough nature. Both Jewish and Gentiles immigrated to the island and before too long there was a significant number Jews living there.

As it turned out, some of the Cretans went to the Jewish festival of Pentecost and witnessed something incredible; the Holy Spirit descending on the apostles after which the Cretans were moved to be converted.

They heard Peter proclaim that Jesus was the long-awaited messiah. It is believed that these Cretans might have taken the faith back to the island. Before too long Paul was released from prison and he made a trip to Crete. He was concerned about the nature of the believers there as well as their unruly behavior.

There needed to be a special type of leader who was not afraid of unruly people but one they could respect. Paul had an ideal choice: a Greek named Titus. After Paul left Crete, he wrote a letter to Titus with instructions and guidance on how to bring on a transformation of the congregation in Crete.

These instructions included how to choose Elders and even how slaves should be treated. Instructions were also included for older women and men and, in general, how the congregation members should interact with each other. This is the letter we are studying today.

In the church of today, it would be nice if every member of the congregation was humble, loving, and racially accepting but it wasn't that way on Crete and it is not that way universally today in general.

Pastors have to be be able to rise above problems or conflicts of their job. To some extent, the Pastor is always under inspection by some members of the congregation. They expect him to be a model of righteous behavior. Similar requirements were applied to the Elders of the church and Titus was challenged with the difficult task or finding elders for the church in Crete. (2 Titus 2:5-6). We can only imagine how difficult his job must have been considering the nature of some of the Cretans.

 

 

 

 

 

 


July 14, 2024 – At Home In The Community

Principle Topic – Philemon

Focus Verses (KJV)- Philemon 1:1-18 KJV

Focus Verses (NLT)- Philemon 1:1-18 NLT

(Pop-up references come from courtesy of Faithlife Reftagger)


The Key Verse -

(In King James Version):

"Having confidence in thy obedience I wrote unto thee, knowing that thou wilt also do more than I say."
Philemon 1:21 KJV

(In New Living Translation):

"I am confident as I write this letter that you will do what I ask and even more!" Philemon 1:21 NLT



What shall we learn from this lesson:

Philemon was a wealthy Roman citizen from Colossae. When Paul's coworker Epaphras started a church in Colossae, Philemon became a member and a leader. Philemon had a slave called Onesimus who in some manner wronged Philemon and then escaped.

Onesimus went to Paul in prison to seek help with his predicament. During his interaction with Paul, Onesimus became a Christian which made Paul view him differently.

This is because Onesimus, a Christian, had to resolve his dispute with Philemon, also a Christian. As time progressed, Onesimus also became an assisstant of Paul, further complicating their problem.

Paul wanted Philemon to forgive Onesimus and welcome him home as a fellow brother in the faith. In fact, Paul used the word "partners. (from the Greek word Koinonia "). That word implies that all of Jesus' followers are equal partners who share in the gift of God's Grace and Love.

With this in mind, Paul makes a masterful argument to Philemon in the letter by stating that he will repay anything that Onesimus owes Philemon. Paul then states what the new life through Jesus means:

"Here there is no Gentile or Jew, circumcised or uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave or free, but Christ is all, and is in all.

Forgive as the Lord forgave you. Bear with each other and forgive one another if any of you has a grievance against someone. Forgive as the Lord forgave you." Colossians 3:11.

The fact that Philemon and Onesimus were then brothers in Jesus makes the master-slave relationship irrevelant. Within the church we are all brothers and sisters in Christ.

 

 

 



July 21, 2024 – Christ as Intercessor


Principle Topic – Hebrews

Focus Verses (KJV)- Hebrews 7:20-28 KJV

Focus Verses (NLT)- Hebrews 7:20-28 NLT

(Pop-up references come from courtesy of Faithlife Reftagger)


The Key Verse -

(In King James Version):

"Wherefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them." Hebrews 7:25 KJV


(In New Living Translation):

"Therefore he is able, once and forever, to save those who come to God through him. He lives forever to intercede with God on their behalf." Hebrews 7:25 NLT



What shall we learn from this lesson:

Philemon was a wealthy Roman citizen from Colossae. When Paul's coworker Epaphras started a church in Colossae, Philemon became a member and a leader. Philemon had a slave called Onesimus who in some manner wronged Philemon and then escaped.

Onesimus went to Paul in prison to seek help with his predicament. During his interaction with Paul, Onesimus became a Christian which made Paul view him differently.

This is because Onesimus, a Christian, had to resolve his dispute with Philemon, also a Christian. As time progressed, Onesimus also became an assisstant of Paul, further complicating their problem.

Paul wanted Philemon to forgive Onesimus and welcome him home as a fellow brother in the faith. In fact, Paul used the word "partners. (from the Greek word Koinonia "). That word implies that all of Jesus' followers are equal partners who share in the gift of God's Grace and Love.

With this in mind, Paul makes a mastereful argument to Philemon in the letter by stating that he will repay anything that Onesimus owes Philemon. Paul then states what the new life through Jesus means:

"Here there is no Gentile or Jew, circumcised or uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave or free, but Christ is all, and is in all.

Forgive as the Lord forgave you. Bear with each other and forgive one another if any of you has a grievance against someone. Forgive as the Lord forgave you." Colossians 3:11.

The fact that Philemon and Onesimus were then brothers in Jesus makes the master-slave relationship irrevelant. Within the church we are all brothers and sisters in Christ.

 

 

 




For access to all chapters of the King James Version Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the Audio-Bible.com web site.

For other versions (NIV, New Living Translation, etc.) of the Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the World Wide Study Bible page of Christian Classics Eternal Library site. Also visit the New Living Translation web site.

Some information on this page may be referenced from the NLT Study Bible, the Standard Lesson Commentary, Precepts for Living, Commentary by David Guzik, and gotquestions.org. Frederick L. Marsh is the commentary author of the information contained in the Sunday school segment of this website. He is the author of the book: "The Book of the Holy Spirit: Joyful living." The opinions expressed in the Sunday school segment of this site are his alone.



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